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5 Ways to Be A Soul Mate

The truth is that we have many soul mates in a life time. They are people with whom we have previous life experience and spiritual connection. Re-connecting with them is an experience unlike any other. Sometimes it’s an instant emotional reaction when you meet someone—and others, it’s a subtle knowing or familiarity with a person even though you’ve never met.
Soul mates aren’t always fun-loving, happy-go-lucky, live happily ever after experiences for everyone. Most of the time the connection brings two people together to heal a dynamic left incomplete. Not necessarily incomplete between the people coming together— but the attraction of two people with intersecting life patterns.

The spiritual partners we attract, come when we’re ready to transform or develop the spiritual patterns we have in common with them.

Everyone has a soul group. They are the folks—we have connection and affinity—who may appear in our lives just in time to offer support, a lesson, or love us unconditionally. They are the souls who share our eternity.
The several ways we experience soul mate relationships all have one commonality. It takes cultivated unconditional love to be a soul mate. So, no matter the nature of the relationship, meeting a soul mate deserves your attention, respect, and honor. Here are five ways to be a soulmate.
You Can be an Ally: Allies are people we cross paths with, who can stand with us giving loving support and guidance. We may or may not have a lasting relationship, but the connection with them is sturdy. Living in a big city it’s easy to spot your allies, they show up with a word of encouragement and sometimes come out of nowhere. You can be an ally by speaking well of someone, especially when they’re not in your presence.
You Can be a Lover: Lovers are the men and women that come into our lives to give us love and encouragement for a time. We attract lovers that give us emotional nourishment even if we inevitably outgrow the source. The attraction we have with a karmic lover can be intense and usually is evidence of the healing on its way to us through this powerful soul mate relationship.
You Can be an Enemy: Enemies are the karmic relationships that are profoundly vital to our education and learning of the boundaries of the human spirit. They are the soul mates that come into our lives to show us adversity and compassion. Sometimes, we like these people at first, but something doesn’t feel right. Our enemies offer an opportunity to trust our instincts. They don’t appear to have our best interest at heart and require us to, at times, be self-sufficient. In truth: Our enemies show us who we are and who we choose to be.
You Can be Family: Beloveds are the husbands and wives we choose and the families we are born to. These soul mate relationships can be our biggest teachers. Everybody contends with expectations in a relationship but it’s a unique experience to transcend the unconscious expectations of a karmic beloved. Coming together with another based on all the love that was present in the previous life, but not necessarily the way it is now. The intense connection and deep seeded love we share with our beloveds are based in the requirement of a long-term relationship to unveil and express the teaching or healing over time.
You Can be Friends: The good friends we make over a lifetime are often people from our soul group with whom we experience comfort, love, and trust enough to sustain enduring relationships. They’re the ones we can work through conflict and transcend adversity. They are the soul mates who teach us unconditional love, communication—inspire and require us to be better. I’ve had many friendships over my lifetime and the theme they’ve had in common is laughter. It seems to be the ultimate antidote to any confusion, conflict, or disappointment.
The goal of a soul mate relationship is learning to cultivate love on every level. Love unconditional, love with boundaries, and ultimately unshakable love for ourselves. Next time you cross paths with a soul mate—jump in with confidence knowing the greatest outcome is illumination.

Helping Your Partner Through Grief: 5 Things You Need to Know

Being an empath, I make a living through heartache. Yes, sounds like a dream job, I know. Experiencing grief can be anything from uncomfortable to completely debilitating for you and the people you care about. On the upside, anytime you experience heartache, something amazing is happening to you. Your heart, mind, and body are processing out the old information —the loss and how things were— to create space for new information and experiences to come in.
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Conscious Life Expo 2017!

Now is the time to gain insight and power over your spiritual world. At this lecture, you’ll learn to recognize your spirit guides and other entities in your midst and their differences. Discover the origin of dark forces and how to transform them. And, understand past or current- life influences— how they impact your present life and how to heal them.

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7 Ways to Transform Your Addictive Patterns

“Reality is just a crutch for people who can’t handle drugs.”
― Robin McLaurin Williams

Addiction’s become the buzz word of the twenty-first century, it seems like everyone you meet’s been to rehab. There are so many stereotypical images of addiction we’ve come across: a member of the local homeless crowd or someone who’s strung out on Meth, Crack, Heroin, or Oxy. Maybe an alcoholic that we’re related to, and don’t forget the movie stars. They’ve all been to rehab at least once, or so the media would have you believe. Well, what if those images are just the tip of the iceberg? What if addiction begins somewhere we can’t see?

If you’re in recovery yourself then you know addiction is a multi-faceted condition that impacts everyone: friends, family, co-workers, and the federal government. To whom many indigent addicts turn, to pay for their rehabilitation. The natural image of addiction that’s programmed into our heads of those who suffer from extreme substance abuse, gambling, or porn. The very definition of addiction refers to a behavior in life that has become so out of control that one’s life is no longer manageable.

But what about the rest of us? Changing your outer view of addiction can go a long way in helping to transform the patterns that no longer serve you.

The truth is: those images of life-long addicts really, only account for a low percentage of people who struggle with addictive tendencies. Some studies say approximately 3 out of 4 people will manage their relationship to substances and eventually quit on their own without professional help.

We are all born with the spiritual patterns that can determine addiction. How you deal with those patterns is based on your ability, opportunity, and willingness to do the spiritual, mental, and emotional work necessary to process the underlying grief that generates them. Yes, that’s right, I said grief generates addiction.

“We suffer the most about the things that we have the least awareness of. “
—Master Your Inner World: Embrace Your Power with Joy

Every day, we address multiple layers of our own grief and the grief of others. Grief is layered. It’s our emotional response to loss on any level: mental, emotional, spiritual, or physical. Perceived loss is mental, emotional or spiritual loss. One of the nifty tricks our spirit has of helping us to see ourselves is to attract things to our outer world that most closely identify what personifies our inner world. So, we tend to pay attention to the grief and suffering of others which naturally for a time, compounds our own. This is the automatic repetitive cycle addicts seek to cover up or manage with their addiction of choice. The problem is, anesthetizing the problem only prolongs it.

Here are seven goals to transform your addictive patterns and process your grief:
Let go of thinking others control your life: You are the only one that controls your life. Now, don’t get me wrong— this belief can cause enormous stress and change, but to innovate this thinking will strengthen you in every way. For example, work. Maybe you lost your job and don’t have the skills for the job that’s available to you? That can feel like you’re at the mercy of your community and what they can provide.

The truth is: What’s not available to you isn’t yours for the time. Adjust your focus to asking the question: What’s the best way for me to make money now? Your world will present to you the possibilities and start you on a new path.

Consider that you’ll get more support while being openly independent: Often, feeling isolated and alone is at the helm of addiction. The consistent focus on the need for others or being needed by them. The truth is: We are all one in spirit. Not in body. Each body must learn and be nurtured to do for themselves first, and then to do for others. The more you feel you need help from others is the time to find the courage and strength to get what you need for yourself.

Learn to champion yourself: Standing up for yourself could very well be the most valuable thing you ever learn to do. Victimization is best friends with addiction and your goal is to understand why you feel victimized. Tracing it back to its origin and then feeling the pain it caused. Doing this will empower you to take the actions that will avoid those same original circumstances.

Practice being brave in your communication with others: It’s a natural response to vacate a situation where you don’t know what comes next, but fight or flight is for survival purposes only. Teaching yourself to think through hard feelings and give them voice will ultimately help you communicate your feelings and needs to others. Telling it like it is can be the beginning of your freedom.

Acknowledge anger as a message pointing to an unmet need: The purpose of anger is to bring to the surface unprocessed grief and show what you must learn to give yourself. Most importantly, anger is not permanent. If anger persists, you’re not getting its message. For example: Getting angry because you feel disrespected by others is showing you how you may not be respecting yourself or communicating your needs.

Embrace accountability: What I’ve found in my own spiritual practice and working with clients is being accountable for your thoughts, feelings, and actions—builds trust. Trusting yourself to get all your needs met allows you to attract and nurture relationships not created out of need. There will always be give and take in relationship to others but freeing yourself from the disappointment that need creates is a lot more fun.

“The good news is that when you embrace the process of discovery, your path becomes fun, exhilarating, and—at times—awe-inspiring.”
—Master Your Inner World: Embrace Your Power with Joy

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